All Research Projects

All research projects at the School of Engineering. You can search keywords within Project title and filter by Research Institute or Research Theme.

We also have many exciting Engineering PhD Opportunities for postgraduate students looking to join the School.

Search within Project titles
  • This project aims to create a generally applicable framework for transferring academic innovations in the modelling of particulate materials into industrial practice in the UK. The process of twin-screw granulation has been selected as an exemplar industrial process which is simulated across multiple scales using the coupled methods of population balance modelling and the discrete element method.

    Research Themes: 

    • Granular Mechanics and Industrial Infrastructure
    Fullscale DEM simulation of a ConsiGma 1 TSG
  • Low intensity prescribed fires are often employed in forests and wildland in order to manage hazardous fuels, restore ecological function and historic fire regimes, and encourage the recovery of threatened and endangered species. Current predictive models used to simulate fire behavior during low-intensity prescribed fires (and wildfires) are empirically-based, simplistic, and fail to adequately predict fire outcomes because they do not account for variability in fuel characteristics and interactions with important meteorological variables. Experiments are being carried out at scales ranging from the fuel particle, to fuel bed, to field plot and stand scales, with an aim of better understanding how fuel consumption is related to the processes driving heat transfer, ignition and flame spread, and thermal degradation through flaming and smouldering combustion, at the scale of individual fuel particles and fuel layers. Focus is placed on how these processes, and thus fuel consumption, are affected by spatial variability in fuel particle type, fuel moisture status, bulk density, and horizontal and vertical arrangement of fuel components, as well as multi-scale atmospheric dynamics.

    Research Themes: 

    • Fire Safety Engineering
    Wildland fire
  • The aim of this project is to develop manufacturing upcycling technologies to re-use prepreg scrap and determine the resultant mechanical properties. This project mitigates the environmental impact of conventional composite manufacturing processes reducing air emissions and energy consumption. It also contributes towards a sustainable economy reducing the waste disposal fees paid by commercial companies and recovering commercial value from the composite scrap. 

    Research Themes: 

    • Structural Engineering
    Manufacturing process of recycled composite laminates
  • This project will use novel catalytic nanoparticles for water treatment with emphasis given on the removal of emerging micro-pollutants, such as Bisphenol A (BPA).

    Research Themes: 

    • Environmental Engineering
  • Gas separations on offshore platforms are of increasing importance for the purification of natural gas and for the separation of CO2 used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

    Research Themes: 

    • Carbon Capture and Separation Processes
  • This project aims to innovate and improved solutions for the management of power flows in a hybrid electrical power system, to provide a secure, reliable, and high quality supply to varying load demands. The expected research outcome is the design of a robust and fault-tolerant management system, featuring higher efficiency and improved techno-economic performance.

    • Optimal system sizing through linear programming
    • Testing and analysis of an off-the-shelf hybrid system
    • Novel control system design for optimised performance
    • Lab testing and field testing

    Research Themes: 

    • Electrical Power Conversion
    Diesel Generator
  • This project is a collaboration between SuperGen Marine, the Exeter Centre for Water Resources (Non-SuperGen), Penn State University, Aquascientific Ltd., The Danish Hydraulics Research Institute and is mentored by Garrad Hassan partners. The primary goal is the introduction of a new hybrid optimisation approach that allows the multi-objective optimal design of the layout and power loadings of marine energy farms subject to environmental impacts. It involves a new, academically highly challenging integrated analytic/numerical/experimental, approach to optimising the performance of large tidal stream energy capture farms. The specific application focus involves tidal turbines suited to operating in shallow medium flow estuaries but the technique can be applied to all types of marine energy farms. Optimisation is subject to minimising flood risk, with further environmental impacts, such as sediment transport driven outcomes, being capable of subsequent incorporation as slow timescale effects. The work complements the PERAWAT project and has key partners in common.

    Research Themes: 

    • Offshore Renewable Energy

Pages

Subscribe to All Research Projects