IMNS Research Projects

Research Projects at the Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems (IMNS). You can search keywords within Project Titles.

We also have a number of Integrated Micro and Nano Systems PhD opportunities for postgraduate students looking to join the School.

Search keywords within Research Project titles
Project Title Principal Supervisor Project Summary
ThermaSMART

Dr Prashant Valluri

Project ThermaSMART is an international and intersectoral network of organisations working on a joint research programme in the area of phase-change cooling of high-power electronic devices.

Liquid crystal lasers

Dr Philip Hands

Usually associated with display technology, liquid crystals also have many other applications and uses.  In this research project we are developing liquid crystal lasers, capable of broad wavelength-tuning, multiple simultaneous colour emissions, and highly customisable outputs, all within a small, portable and low-cost architecture.  We are also seeking to integrate liquid crystal lasers into new photonic systems and applications, such as biomedical imaging (e.g. fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry), digital holographic projection, and 2D & 3D displays.

REFINE: A coordinated materials programme for the sustainable reduction of spent fuel vital in a closed loop nuclear energy cycle

Professor Anthony Walton

A coordinated UK research programme delivering the materials science required for sustainable spent fuel reduction in a closed loop nuclear energy cycle. This multidisciplinary programme will deliver the critical research team and the platform technologies to enable scientific advance in related molten salt application areas together with the underpinning process development and training essential to establish and deliver these objectives.

SPADnet: Fully Networked, Digital Components for Photon-starved Biomedical Imaging Systems

Dr Robert Henderson

Single photon sensitive detectors for Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

SACSESS: Safety of Actinide Separation Processes

Prof Anthony Walton

SACSESS kicked off on 1 March 2013. This European collaborative project involves 26 partners from European universities, nuclear research bodies, TSOs and industrial stakeholders and aims to generate fundamental safety improvements on the future design of an Advanced Processing Unit.

Towards electrochemically controlled nucleic acid-amplification strategies

Professor Anthony Walton

Nucleic hybridisation is core to many biological processes and protocols used in molecular biology such as nucleic acid amplification, e.g. by PCR. This project aims to radically simplify nucleic acid amplification by driving the reaction via means of electrochemistry. To fulfil this aim, specialised expertise in biosensors, physical chemistry, biophysics and microsystems engineering is brought together.

PROTEUS: Multiplexed 'Touch and Tell' Optical Molecular Sensing and Imaging

Dr Robert Henderson

This project is all about multi-disciplinary collaboration - and capitalisation in a clinical setting of the many new vistas and opportunities that will arise. As such this research programme brings together a group of world class scientists (physicists, chemists, engineers and computer experts) and clinicians to design, make and test a cutting-edge bedside technology platform which will help doctors in the intensive care unit (ICU) make rapid and accurate diagnoses that would inform therapy and ensure patients get the right treatment, quickly. While we are developing our technology platform with a focus on ICU, it will also be applicable to a wide range of other healthcare situations.

TOTALPHOTON: A Total Photon Camera for Molecular Imaging of Live Cells

Dr Robert Henderson

How can we construct a high-resolution camera capable of imaging the time-of-arrival, polarisation and wavelength of each of the maximal 10Gphoton/s emitted from a labelled, biological cell? Such a measurement would capture the complete information available in the optical signal, and significantly enhance our ability to observe the organisation, movement and interactions of cellular components at molecular scales.

Low Power Indoor Positioning Methods

Professor Tughrul Arslan

The project aims to develop a low power low foot-print mobile positioning technology that operates seamlessly both indoors and in urban areas.

Development of an Instrument for Rapidly Detecting Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water

Dr Robert Henderson

Cryptosporidium is a waterborne microorganism which causes severe diarrhoea and can be fatal for immuno-compromised individuals, infants and young children. It is estimated that Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water results in 250-500 million cases each year in developing countries and 60,000 in the UK alone. The Cryptosporidium organism has a thick outer wall that is resistant to many conventional water treatment methods, and outbreaks are a problem even in the developed world, negatively impacting population health and economic development - daily monitoring of the water supply is required.

Current Cryptosporidium detection methods are expensive and highly time-consuming - requiring microscopic examination by skilled scientists. Furthermore, these techniques lack species and viability information, which is essential to make well-informed public health decisions. There is, therefore, a pressing need for an instrument capable of rapidly analysing drinking water samples for the presence, species and viability of Cryptosporidium microorganisms.

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