IMP Research Projects

Research Projects at the Institute for Materials and Processes (IMP). You can search keywords within Project Titles.

We also have a number of Materials and Processes PhD opportunities for postgraduate students looking to join the School.

Search keywords within Research Project titles
  • The aim of this project is to gain a better understanding of the nature of the interface between rubber and ice. It is a collaborative project with Michelin. We use tribological testing and materials characterisation techniques in a specially designed cold room facility to do this. Ultimately this knowledge will be used to improve tyre traction on ice.

    Research Themes: 

    • Materials Design, Processing and Characterisation
  • The aim of this project is to investigate the friction of rubber and tyre treads on snow. It is a collaborative project with Michelin. We use tribological testing and materials characterisation techniques in a specially designed cold room facility to do this. Ultimately this knowledge will be used to improve tyre traction on snow.

    Research Themes: 

    • Materials Design, Processing and Characterisation
  • Pore wetting is a principal control of the multiphase flows through porous media. However, the contact angle measurement on other than flat surfaces still remains a challenge. In order to indicate the wetting in a small pore, we developed a new pore contact angle measurement technique to directly measure the contact angles of fluids and gas/liquid/supercritical CO2 in micron-sized pores under ambient and reservoir conditions in this study, as well as the effect of chemical functional groups on pore contact angle.

    Research Themes: 

    • Multiphase Flows and Transport Phenomena
  • Membrane processes are a promising alternative to the more classical post-combustion capture technologies due to the reduced maintenance of the process, the absence of dangerous solvents and their smaller footprint. This project aims at supporting the development of new mixed matrix membranes for post-combustion applications. Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) are composite materials formed by embedding inorganic fillers into a polymeric matrix in order to overcome the upper bound and combine the characteristics of the two solid phases: mechanical properties, economical processing capabilities and permeability of the polymer and selectivity of the filler. Despite several studies on the concept, the interactions between the two phases and their effect on the transport properties are not well understood. Yet, this fundamental knowledge is crucial in order to design the reliable materials needed for real-world-applications.

    Research Themes: 

    • Carbon Capture and Separation Processes
  • Carbon capture from power stations and industrial sources is an essential pillar in the effort of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in order to achieve the legally binding target set by the 2008 Climate Change Act of 80% reductions by 2050. The current state-of-the-art technologies for post-combustion capture (including retrofit options for existing plants) are based on amine scrubbers, but inherent energy requirements make this an expensive option and significant research is aimed at the development of next generation carbon capture processes that reduce the cost of capital equipment and the energy needed.

    Research Themes: 

    • Carbon Capture and Separation Processes
  • Gas separations on offshore platforms are of increasing importance for the purification of natural gas and for the separation of CO2 used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

    Research Themes: 

    • Carbon Capture and Separation Processes
  • Bubbling fluidization has been widely applied in process industries, such as power generation from coal, renewable energy production, gasification and pyrolysis. In this study, we attempted to predict solid flow patterns, solid and gas mixing, bubble behaviour in a bubbling fluidized bed based on operational conditions and bed design.

    Research Themes: 

    • Multiphase Flows and Transport Phenomena
  • In optimizing the properties of functional materials it is essential to understand in detail how structure influences properties. Identification of the most important structural parameters is time-consuming and usually investigated by preparing many different chemical modifications of a material, determining their crystal structures, measuring their physical properties and then looking for structure-property correlations. It is also necessary to assume that the chemical modifications have no influence other than to distort the structure, which is often not the case.

    Research Themes: 

    • Materials Design, Processing and Characterisation

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